Katia Ricciarelli: One is born with a talent, that, when the desire arises, one tries to transform into a profession. My 50-year career speaks for itself. You need to have a dream and then cultivate it: never stop.

I wanted to ask you about your relationship with television as a pioneering theatrical performer, and how by venturing into TV, you brought a greater degree of exposure to the profession? I mean that in the sense that you made the perception of the opera diva public, removing the idea of the veneration of sopranos as unattainable creatures.

Ultimately, we no longer live in the era of singers and divas that are worshipped and protected by their audience. Now the world has changed, we need to be more eclectic. This means that a performer must try other things too. Each singer’s fantastic instrument, the voice, is incorporated in our body and subject to physiological changes and mutations. So, it is also clever to be intelligent. For me it is a matter of pride to have also found other ways to work: through professionalism I have always done better, even in different fields.

In theatre we talk about catharsis: when did you discover that theatre was your vocation, the profession perfectly suited to your personality?

I knew it ever since I was eight years old – the opera world was immediately a place that I wanted to be a part of, and so I completely immersed myself in it. One is born with a talent, that, when the desire arises, one tries to transform into a profession. My 50-year career speaks for itself. You need to have a dream and then cultivate it: never stop.

Read the entire interview & many other interesting articles here, in the anniversary issue of OPERA Charm Magazine.

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